Roanoke VA In Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains

WHY GO: Roanoke VA, a major city in Virginia’s Blue Ridge (VBR) Mountain region, earned its fame as railroad and coal town. Once considered the “Moonshine Capital of the World,” (more illegal hooch was distilled here during prohibition than in any other area of the USA), Virginia’s Blue Ridge is now known for a healthier pastime: mountain biking.

Roanoke Bike Sculpture on drive up Mill Mountain

Bikers prove their mettle pumping uphill for miles to get to the Roanoke Star. If your bike happens to get damaged, there are Bike Repair posts along the way – including at the parking lot on top – where you’ll find the tools you need to fix almost anything.

Bike Repair Station on top of Mill Mountain Roanoke VA

But with a re-emerging downtown, the largest lit star in the world, great new (and old) restaurants,  an historic hotel, and a newly opened Bank-repurposed boutique hotel, Roanoke is a hot-spot once again.

But, wait, there’s more! You can also explore some small towns with outsized charm right nearby. We cover Roanoke and Salem, and more.  Just read on.

(Have a few more days? Discover Lynchburg VA, just a bit over an hour away).

Table of Contents

Things to Do in Roanoke VA

Roanoke Skywalk
Roanoke Skywalk

WALK: On the Skywalk

Perched over wide set of railroad tracks, take a moment to pause midway, and you may see a freight train barreling towards (then under) you going 35 MPH.

Roanoke VA Train Tracks under sky walkway
Roanoke VA Train Tracks

The glass skywalk links the Hotel Roanoke to downtown, so when you descend the escalator, you’ll have a great choice of things to do.

Center in the Square Roanoke VA
Center in the Square Roanoke VA

VISIT: Center In the Square

First built in 1983 and renovated in 2013, this multi-level series of museums is worth several hours, or more, to explore. The Center in the Square incorporates the Harrison Museum of African American Culture, the Science Museum of Western Virginia, and the highly interactive Starcade and Roanoke Pinball Museums. 

Science Museum of Western VA Center in the Square Roanoke VA

Science Museum of Western VA

Interact with and feed a bevy of colorful chirping birds in the Parakeet Garden. Learn to fly a spaceship and create your own missions. Discover how your Amazing Arteries supply blood cells to all parts of your body.

Parakeet Garden at Center in the Square Science Center Roanoke VA

You can do all this and more in this highly engaging museum on two floors.It’s hands-on learning at its best. Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5, (closed on Mondays during school year), $15.50 adults, $14 kids.

Harrison Museum of African American History Center in the Square Roanoke VA

Harrison Museum of African American Culture

While there are no bells and whistles in this must-see museum, there are plenty silent exhibits that spark conversation. You are bound to feel the influence and contributions of the African American culture and people in the Roanoke Valley through the memorabilia, photographs, and artifacts on exhibit.

Although there are marvelous pieces of folk and fine art to ponder, this small place speaks volumes about the Black experience in Virginia in other ways as well.

Information about Henry St in Roanoke VA at Harrison Museum of African American History

The city of Roanoke had the first Life Saving Crew of Color in the USA (1941-1987), when Virginia was a deeply segregated state. And, like Tulsa Oklahoma, and many other cities in the early 20th Century, Roanoke was home to a thriving Black Wall Street – Henry Street. However, in this case it was demolished not by bombs and slaughter, but by Urban Renewal, which wiped out services, and thus the community’s economic base.

Roanoke’s Black history is told in candid photos and artifacts in this quiet yet powerful museum. Though they say, “A picture is worth a thousand words,” these remnants of the past are worth a hundred times that.

Oldest pinball machine 1932 at Pinball Museum Center in the Square Roanoke VA

Pinball Museum

Where can you spend a day as Bruce Springsteen put it, “banging those pleasure machines?” At the Pinball Museum in Center in the Square. The oldest pinball in this collection is a 1932 wooden spring-activated game, manufactured during Prohibition and the Great Depression. The newest is a 2019 Black Knight machine. Play all 60 pinball games in this most interactive “Museum” for just $13.50. For as long as you’d like.

Mother Son Video Game Players Starcade Center in the Square Roanoke VA

Starcade

As opposed to the Pinball Museum, this second arcade-like “Museum” incorporates all kinds of games: from Skee Ball to air hockey to video games. And, each is topped with an information panel that describes it with date of origin.

Video Game Player at Starcade Center in the Square Roanoke VA

Yes, you can play Pac Man and Donkey Kong, and everything before and after. Starcade brings parents and kids – and, also, couples on date night – together big time. $12 for unlimited play.

Downtown Roanoke VA with Appalachian Mountains

Center in the Square Rooftop

Before leaving, don’t miss the incredible, singular views from the top of Center in the Square. From this perspective, Roanoke seems like a train set panorama.

Entrance to O Winston Link Museum Roanoke VA

VISIT: O. Winston Link Museum, Western VA Historical Society, Raymond Lowey Gallery, and Virginia’s Blue Ridge Visitor’s Center

All of these museums and agencies are in the restored Norfolk and Western Railroad’s (former) Passenger Station. How fitting, given the important part this industry played in Roanoke’s history.

Raymond Lowey Gallery

Raymond Lowey, an Industrial and Product Designer who was considered the “Father of Streamlining,” renovated the N&W Passenger Station in 1949. Over the years, his designs included lipstick tubes, logos, the Greyhound Bus, and an experimental “Bullet Train” (it looked just like a bullet) for the Pennsylvania RR: the S1 Locomotive.

Raymond Loewy Locomotive design

Lowey’s clients were all over the map. And, in outer space. NASA hired him to design the interior of Skylab. A series of panels depicting Lowey’s work can be found on the main floor right behind the Virginia Blue Ridge (VBR) Visitor’s Center desk.

O Winston Link photo of steam train Roanoke VA

O. Winston Link Museum

O. Winston Link was a celebrated New York photographer with a passion for the N&W Railroad and the people who worked for it. As a labor of love, he documented the last five years of steam locomotives, from 1955 to May 9, 1960, in Vermeer-ish photographs known for their artfully lit night scenes.

Couple in car photo by O Winston Link Roanoke VA Museum

Coal, passenger, and freight trains, workers, and train-spotters all get the spectacular, moody and magical Link treatment in his photos. You can also see the photographer’s dark room, his equipment (including lighting), and if interested, Link’s archives.

Western VA Historical Society

The Link Museum merges right into the Western VA Historical Society. Exhibits trace the history of Roanoke from Native American to today. Initially a European settlement of 669 residents, it was called Big Lick (referencing animal salt licks in the area). Roanoke became a boomtown in the 1880’s when coal, and then trains to transport it, drove the population up to over 20,000. Museums open 10-4:30, Tues – Sat.

Center for American Art
Taubman Museum of Art, Roanoke VA

VISIT: Taubman Museum of Art

Designed by Randall Stout – an associate of Frank Gehry – and much in the organic Gehry style, the contemporary Taubman Museum of Art is as much an architectural statement as an art museum. Chief among the collection is John Singer Sergeant’s Norah. Clad in a bustled black dress, she stares alluringly from the canvas.

Judith Leiber Collection at Taubman Art Museum Roanoke VA
Judith Leiber at Taubman Museum of Art

The most unique and popular exhibit, however, is Rosalie Shaftman’s collection of 130 Judith Leiber crystal and semi-precious stone-encrusted handbags, the largest collection of these exquisite Leiber pieces outside of The Leiber Museum in the Hamptons. Open Tues-Sat. 10-5, Thursdays open till 9pm. FREE.

Historic Roanoke City Market plaque

VISIT: City Market and Outdoor Farmer’s Market Plaza

Roanoke’s central market is one hallmark of a thriving downtown. The Market Building itself was built in 1922 with running water and newfangled refrigeration.

Roanoke VA Farmers Market
Roanoke VA Farmers Market

At the outdoor Farmer’s Market, just-picked produce tops dozens of built-in concrete tables alongside shops and boutiques.

Virginia Museum of Transportation
Virginia Museum of Transportation, Roanoke VA

VISIT: Virginia Museum of Transportation

Set in a former freight station, this massive museum is filled with cars, airplanes and, of course, trains. There’s over 50 pieces of “rolling stock, consisting of powerful locomotives and other rail cars,” according to their brochure.

City planners conceived an interactive “Rail Walk” linking the museum to downtown, four blocks away. Along the walk, which traverses Roanoke’s central and very active train tracks, are informational plaques, train-wheel benches and crosswalk rails that go up and down at the push of a button. Open Mon-Sat. 10-5, Sun 1-5. $12, adults, $8 kids.

H and C Coffee Neon Sign Roanoke VA

PHOTO OP: H&C Coffee Sign, Roanoke

This neon sign is owned and maintained by the Center in the Square. It just goes to show that the Roanoke Star is not the only light sculpture that defines this VBR town.

Roanoke Star VA
Roanoke Star VA

GO: Roanoke Star

Drive up Mill Mountain and follow signs to the Roanoke Star (parking is for both the Star and Mill Mountain Zoo – see below). At 88 1/2 feet tall, and standing 1,045 feet above the city of Roanoke, this neon lit structure is considered the “World’s Largest Manmade Star” – at least when it was built in 1949.

Roanoke VA at night from Roanoke Star

Still, it’s impressive, and the views from up here are unparalleled. Bringing the experience into the 21st Century, you can text a link to family and friends – www.roanokeva.gov/starcam – and wave to them via the “Star Cam.”

Red Panda Mill Mountain Zoo Roanoke VA

GO: Mill Mountain Zoo, Roanoke

Even without kids in tow, zoos, run with heart, offer universal appeal. This small, accredited conservation zoo is one such place. Reaching its 70th anniversary on July 4th 2022, the 13-acre Mill Mountain Zoo features 200 animals, including an antic Red Panda and 3% of the world’s Red Wolf population.

There’s a massive pig named Homer (no Charlotte in sight, however) who was found on the side of the road in distress. Homer joins a couple of Palace Cats hand-reared from babies, a Snow Leopard, and “Romantic Otters” who are always grooming each other.

Ferociously dedicated animal caregivers at Mill Mountain Zoo Roanoke VA

Animal caregivers are “ferociously dedicated” to their charges who come here for seven distinct reasons: critically endangered, endangered, vulnerable, threatened, injured, owner relinquishes, or captive birth.

Endangered Red Wolf Mill Mountain Zoo Roanoke VA

As for the critically endangered Red Wolves, there are less than 20 remaining in the wild. In the world. Mill Mountain Zoo is one of just 42 institutions to house a family pack. And, although you can take a peek at them, they are not acclimated to humans due to plans to reintroduce them back into the wild. Open daily year round 10-5 (last entry 4pm), $7.

Blue Ridge Pkwy

DRIVE: Blue Ridge Parkway

From the Roanoke Star, it’s a mere three miles to the entrance of the Blue Ridge Parkway at Exit 121. Get a taste of this gorgeous 469-mile ribbon of road by traveling as far as you’d like. You may start to plan a Blue Ridge Parkway road trip right then and there.

Treetop Quest at Explore Park Roanoke VA

RECREATION/PLAY/STAY: Explore Park

The 1,100 acre public Explore Park, situated along the Roanoke River, offers a disparate selection of activities and establishments. Where else would you put Aerial Adventure Treetop Quest Course, cabins that look like Conestoga Wagons, and yep, a Brew Pub?

You’ll not only find those, but also a riverside campground, a 9-hole Disc Golf Course, and a Kayak/SUP rental: all in one massive green and woodsy compound.

At Treetop Quest, $39 adults, $15 kids will get you geared up, oriented, and let loose in the trees (safely hooked in), on up to five levels of nets, ropes, and treetop features, for 2 ½ hours.

Don’s Cab-Inns

Speaking of the cabins, Don’s Cab-Inns are designed as tiny houses and yurts, clustered together near a central bath/shower building. Each is equipped with a microwave, mini fridge, heat, and AC. (Bring your own bedding).

Compact tiny cabins Dons Cab-Inns at Explore Park Roanoke VA

Considered safe for solo travelers and their doggy friends, this is a great budget option while traveling to this part of Virginia’s Blue Ridge Parkway. One wildly happy woman (with dog) mentioned that she paid $117 for three nights (total) in March. Prices vary by season.

Roanoke VA from top of Center in the Square

HIKE: Three Appalachian Trail Peaks

Roanoke is the largest city close to the Appalachian Trail. Within half an hour from the city, you can get to the trailhead for a hiker’s “bucket list” 30-mile loop trek that takes you to three peaks: Dragon’s Tooth, McAfee Knob, and Tinker Cliffs.

Greenway Bike Path Roanoke VA

BIKE/RENT: Roanoke Mountain Adventures

Running for about 10 miles along the Roanoke River, the Greenway is a city release-valve, where walkers and cyclists enjoy leafy forays.

Ride all the way to Grandin Village for a whole day (see below), or plan on just a few hours. It’s particularly fine at the day’s end, when oncoming sunset and shadows make the path and river extra magical. Two hours $20, 24 hours $30.

Black Dog Salvage Roanoke VA
Black Dog Salvage

VISIT: Black Dog Salvage, Grandin Village

You can spend a weekend in this charming neighborhood village just a five minute drive (or 30 minute bike ride on the Greenway) from downtown – but leave a few hours for the one establishment that has put Roanoke VA on the international map.

Black Dog Salvage 2
Black Dog Salvage, Roanoke VA

Black Dog Salvage is home base for the Salvage Dawgs (DIY and HGTV), Mike Whiteside and Robert Kulp, who take apart buildings and make really cool things out of the pieces (or sell them at Black Dog Salvage).

Black Dog Salvage 3
Doors and Shutters awaiting their second life at Black Dog Salvage, Roanoke

Black Dog Salvage occupies a series of large warehouses crammed with reclaimed materials of every kind, that are truly overwhelming in scope.  One whole cavernous room is full of individual vendors who sell everything from doorknobs (Fabulous Knobs, $5-$7), iron accessories (Rustoration), antique prints (Appalachia Press) and so, so, so much more.

You’ll discover bed frames made from horse-jump posts, chairs made of doors, more loose wooden shutters than you’ve ever seen in one place, and nearly everything you’d ever need for your up-cycling projects, including consultation and assistance.

Black Dog Salvage Jeff Ellis Roanoke VA
Black Dog Salvage Jeff Ellis Roanoke VA

Furniture designer, Jeff Ellis, whips up new ideas in his workshop downstairs. Not only does he create repurposed furniture for Black Dog, but he works with customers to come up with ideas.

Discover: Historic Grandin Village

After checking out “Dawgs” place, linger in Grandin Village for awhile. Stop into Too Many Books for rare and out of print tomes and indie-art flick Grandin Theater for that foreign movie you just dying to see. If you’re in the mood for a pre-movie- pie, Grace’s Pizza is an excellent choice. Or try farm-to-table Local Root Restaurant and follow up with a cool treat at Pop’s Ice Cream.

DISTILLERY: Twin Creeks Distillery, Rocky Mount (25 miles from Roanoke)

During Prohibition, more moonshine came out of Franklin County VA than from anywhere else in the USA. This led to the “Moonshine Conspiracy of 1935:” the indictment of 80 distillers involved in the illegal production and distribution moonshine whiskey. The 3rd generation son of one of those 80 moonshiners, Chris Prillaman, owns the now very legal Twin Creeks Distillery.

Decorative transfers at Blue Moon Mercantile Salem VA

EXPLORE: Salem VA

Just 20 minutes from Roanoke, this small Blue Ridge town is, ironically, home to Roanoke College. If you’re a small town Main Street fan, you’ll love strolling this one, replete with some antique shops, cool boutiques, and good restaurants.

Brooks Byrd Pharmacy lost in time Salem VA

Shop Salem VA

Stop into Wondrous Books & More for used and new tomes, Brooks-Byrd Pharmacy for old-fashioned charm, and several antique shops including Grandma’s Attic and Charlottes Web. Blue Moon Antiques and Mercantile is particularly engrossing in that it combines a selection of antiques with DIY craft items (such as floral transfers) to beautify them.

Stay Salem VA

The Lofts at Downtown Salem aka Salem Motor Lofts, offer luxury suites in a former auto factory.

Roanoke Star on Mill Mountain

DISCOUNT: VBR Savings Pass

Just sign up for the VBR Savings Pass and you’ll get discounts and goodies all over Virginia’s Blue Ridge region. Grab free appetizers, shot glasses, and more in Roanoke, Rocky Mount (Franklin County), and Salem with this complementary pass

TOUR: Discover Roanoke Food Tours

There’s no better way to sample Roanoke’s blossoming food scene than with a food tour. Begin at the Hotel Roanoke, and you’ll hear about the history of the city, its people and restaurant scene as you stop at seven of them in three hours. Sat at 11am. $63 per person (limited to 17 people per tour).

Best Places to Eat in Roanoke VA and Virginia’s Blue Ridge

Lucky Restaurant Roanoke VA

EAT: Lucky

“French Inspired Southern Comfort Food,” or “Grandma’s cooking with French Training”, Lucky is tough to define. You’ll find the likes of Buttermilk Fried Chicken, Coca Cola Soy Tuna With Watermelon, Boiled Peanuts, and Roasted Marrow Bones on the inventive, eclectic menu that changes daily depending on what ingredients look good that day.

Cocktails verge on kitchen chemistry: try the signature “Cube” – frozen blocks of mixed juices over which Bourbon is poured. The flavor of the drink changes as the cube melts. Even the end of the meal is topped off by whimsy – the check is clipped onto a 45 record.

Sidecar Restaurant bar Roanoke VA

EAT/COCKTAILS: Sidecar, Roanoke

Get your old and new-fashioned cocktails at this fantastic tavern re-imagined for speakeasy-fans of today. While the Sidecar bar takes up most of the room, and the cocktails are inventive, not to mention swell, the food is excellent as well.

Beamers 25 Restaurant exterior Roanoke VA

Beamer’s 25, Roanoke

Friendly service, great beer and terrific burgers. The casual Beamer’s 25 (named for Coach Frank Beamer, VA Tech) is a short hike from the Market District, but worth it for its elevated pub food.

Newly renovated 1882 Lobby Bar Hotel Roanoke VA

EAT/DRINK: 1882 Lobby Bar and Pine Room at Hotel Roanoke

You won’t find a prettier watering hole than the newly renovated 1882 Lobby Bar at the Hotel Roanoke. And, in the adjacent Pine Room, you can watch chefs at work through the open kitchen. The  “Crispy Cauliflower” appetizer, slathered in chili sauce and honey, will send you into vegan nirvana.

Scratch Biscuit interior Grandin Village Roanoke VA

Scratch Biscuit, Grandin Village

Whatever you want on a mouthwatering biscuit – it’s yours – at Scratch Biscuit. Sure, start with traditional egg and cheese. But daring folks will move on to more diner-ish stuffing, like fried chicken or corned beef and Swiss cheese.

The humble Roanoker with ethereal biscuits
The humble Roanoker with ethereal biscuits

EAT: The Roanoker

If you do nothing else, come to this humble 75-year-old diner for the ethereal biscuits that have been “perfected over time” and even mentioned on the Today Show. A local favorite, you’d just pass right by this 300 seat brick building unless you knew to stop for its signature Country Ham with Red-Eye Gravy, Sausage Gravy and of course the discs of flaky dough that practically float through the air.

Blue Cow Ice Cream on way to or from Roanoke Star

ICE CREAM: Blue Cow, Roanoke

You’ll find the inventive Blue Cow Ice Cream Co. right at the base of the Roanoke Star’s Mill Mountain. Ice cream disher-outers will talk you into flavors that might sound weird (or even gross) at first – but will become your favorites after one try. Trust me. I’m now obsessed with both the Goat Cheese Blueberry, and Sea Salt Brickle. Oh my.

EAT: Salem VA

Frankie Rowland’s Steakhouse

It’s not too surprising that one of the best restaurants in the area, Frankie Rowland’s Steakhouse, sits right across from Roanoke College in Salem. Home to the famous Pineapple Martini, Rowland’s is so popular, a second one recently opened in the city of Roanoke.

Mac and Bobs restaurant Salem VA

Mac & Bob’s

Another local favorite, Mac & Bob’s, went through some financial challenges a few years back, and the town rose to save it. This community staple, known for its plate-sized Calzones, also serves up salads, sandwiches, and subs, with lots of heart.

Old Salem Brewing Co Salem VA

Olde Salem Brewing Co

This small town does have its very own brewery – Olde Salem Brewing Co. – which in my humble opinion, wins the prize for naming its brews – and for its sours. Categories include “Mother Puckers” for Sours, “Common Folk” for light and easy, and “Hop Bombs.” Beers are named Bare Necessities, Work Hard Play Hard, and Loud Pipes. Frank’s Pizza and El Jefe (see below) deliver here, so you can make a meal out of it.

Other Popular Salem Eateries

Other college-kid approved eateries include Joe’s Deli, El Jefe, Frank’s Pizza, and Elderberry’s for smoothies. Those with a nut or gluten allergy will be happy to discover approved treats at Corbin’s Confections – a totally nut and gluten-free bakery.

Where to Stay in Roanoke and Virginia’s Blue Ridge

Liberty Trust Hotel exterior Roanoke VA

STAY: Liberty Trust Hotel, Roanoke

Boutique hotel lovers seeking a rich overnight experience will want to book where the rich used to stash their cash: at the 54-room Liberty Trust Bank – now the Liberty Trust Hotel in downtown Roanoke.

The 7-story French Renaissance and Beaux Art designed “Temple of Finance,” (as one newspaper headline blared) was built in 1910 when banks were handsome, stately, and built to last. In fact, Liberty Trust was the first building in Roanoke with electricity. It remained a bank into the 1980’s, when the structure became an office building.

Intimate vault room Liberty Trust Hotel Roanoke VA

By 2018, new owners enlisted the help of the local Salvage Dawgs to, well, salvage what they saw fit, and aid in redesigning the lobby. The stunning bank vault, open to reveal a private space meant for two, has been preserved, along with other impressive architectural elements, like the original embellished bronze main doors, granite exterior with carved rosettes, and balustrade roof.

US Mail letter shoot from 7th floor Liberty Trust Hotel Virginias Blue Ridge

There’s even a working US Mail shoot that runs from the 7th floor. One of only six Preferred Hotels of the World in the state of Virginia, staying in one of the stylish, modern rooms is a romantic, luxurious experience.

Stunning lobby of Liberty Trust Hotel Roanoke VA

First Impressions of Liberty Trust Hotel

First, the lobby. Up-cycled, yet preserved in its marble glory, your first encounter will surely stop you in your tracks. Gleaming marble columns support the soaring ceiling, showing off a new bar (slated to be in full swing, summer 2022), and burnished steel-brass vault at the back of the room. Overall, it’s a stellar space.

Food At Liberty Trust

By summer 2022, bartenders and waiters will stand in the place of bank cashiers – dispensing small bites and cocktails instead of dollar bills. Owners intend to host wine and chocolate tastings, and other festive programming to engage the community.

7th floor guest room with view of Roanoke and Appalachian Mountains Liberty Trust Hotel

Rooms at Liberty Trust

Eye catching contemporary guest rooms sport hound’s-tooth plaid throws and pillows, grey patterned area rugs, and, from high floors, exceptional views of Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains. Beds are sink-in-able dreamy. There’s an old-fashioned dial phone on the desk, and, as a treat – chocolates and 2 bottles of Evian water (complimentary).

Geometric-tile shower at Liberty Trust Hotel Roanoke

Bathrooms bring this early 1900’s building into the modern, boutique 21st century. Rain showers, clad in cool geometric tiles, pack a statement punch. And marble floors hark back to the elegant past.

Rooms start at $189 per night, includes wi-fi, bottled water, chocolate treat, Nespresso Machine in room. Double Queen on 7th floor (largest) from $200-$500 depending on season and day of week.

Just FYI – if you drive, there is no valet. Park either in the open lot across the street ($25 for 24 hours), or in the Center in the Square Garage ($8 per 24 hours), 1 ½ block walk.

Hotel Roanoke exterior VA

STAY: Hotel Roanoke

Built in 1882 for visiting railroad executives and expanded in the 1930’s to offer 331 rooms, this Hilton Curio Collection affiliate has, despite recent updates, maintained some historic elements. The colorful granite lobby floor and WPA-like murals above the elevators are original to a 1938 design.

Celebrating its roots, the hotel offers the “Train Lovers Package,” which includes a room overlooking the railroad tracks, breakfast for two, and tickets to the O. Winston Link and Transportation Museums. Rates from $218 per night.

Roanoke VA Pin

4 thoughts on “Roanoke VA In Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains”

  1. Hi Michelle – General Admission is free, though there is a fee for special exhibits.
    Thanks for reading!
    Malerie

  2. Home, sweet home. Lived there till I went to college in the same home in SW. Frequented Grandin Rd. before it was “cool” – just was the neighborhood place. Love the star. Miss the changing foliage since we have been away in Fl. for 42 years. Mom passed away 2 years ago this Christmas and we sold the homeplace so this is the longest I have been away in my life. Missing that great city.

  3. I visited Roanoke for the first time in 1991 and fell in love with the city; in 2000 I permanently moved here from NY and never regretted; awesome weather, beautiful places to see, quiet life and just the low cost of living alone is enough reason to stay. As a musician the only thing I really miss from NY is the jazz scene.

  4. Visited Roanoke,VA recently for my brother’s memorial What a beautiful place. Would love to move there and live.

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